Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar

CES students study polymers

Campbellsville Elementary School fifth-graders are learning about polymers.

 

In Donna White’s class, students have learned that polymers are created by chemical reactions and used very often in everyday life.

 

Students discussed hard and soft polymers, and learned how to make their own slime, which is a soft polymer, at home.

 

To see how a polymer works, White divided her students into groups and gave each a Ziploc bag, which was filled with water.

 

One student held the bag while the other pushed a pencil through the bag.

 

Because the bag acts as a polymer, White said, the water inside the bag doesn’t spill.

 

CES fifth-grade teacher Donna White demonstrates how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-grade teacher Donna White demonstrates how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-grade teacher Donna White demonstrates how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-grade teacher Donna White demonstrates how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-graders Carmen Gurley, at left, and Arthur Singleton see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-graders Carmen Gurley, at left, and Arthur Singleton see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-graders Kaleb Miller, at left, and Dakota Broyles see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-graders Kaleb Miller, at left, and Dakota Broyles see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-graders Mason Fisher, at left, and Keeley Dicken see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-graders Mason Fisher, at left, and Keeley Dicken see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-graders Kate Billeter, at left, and Simon Wilkerson see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-graders Kate Billeter, at left, and Simon Wilkerson see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

 

CES fifth-graders, from left, KeKe Miller, Harley Couch-Allen and Riley Newton see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.

CES fifth-graders, from left, KeKe Miller, Harley Couch-Allen and Riley Newton see how a Ziploc bag acts as a polymer, and, therefore, water inside doesn’t spill when a pencil pierces the bag.





Back to School News      Print News Article