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CHS students perform penny experiment

Campbellsville High School chemistry students recently performed an experiment with pennies.

 

CHS teacher Dee Doss asked students to determine whether their pennies were made of pure copper.

 

Students were given two pennies, one made before 1982 and the other made after 1982.

 

First, students created grooves in the pennies. Then, they placed the pennies in a beaker and soaked them in hydrochloric acid.

 

They observed any reactions happening and then let their pennies sit overnight.

 

In the end, based on the condition of their pennies, students learned that before 1982, pennies were made of pure copper. Afterward, pennies were made of cooper with a zinc coating.

 

CHS senior Micah Corley makes a groove in his group’s penny, as junior Ryan Jeffries watches.

CHS senior Micah Corley makes a groove in his group’s penny, as junior Ryan Jeffries watches.

 

CHS junior Nena Barnett, at left, pours hydrochloric acid on her group’s pennies as classmate Jayden Bridgewater watches.

CHS junior Nena Barnett, at left, pours hydrochloric acid on her group’s pennies as classmate Jayden Bridgewater watches.

 

CHS junior Logan Cole, at right, pours hydrochloric acid on his group’s pennies as classmates Austin Carter, at left, and Dylan Gilbert watch.

CHS junior Logan Cole, at right, pours hydrochloric acid on his group’s pennies as classmates Austin Carter, at left, and Dylan Gilbert watch.

 

CHS teacher Dee Doss, at left, and her students, from left, juniors Jayden Bridgewater and Ethan Lay and their groupmates watch as the hydrochloric acid reacts with their pennies.

CHS teacher Dee Doss, at left, and her students, from left, juniors Jayden Bridgewater and Ethan Lay and their groupmates watch as the hydrochloric acid reacts with their pennies.

 

CHS students soak pennies in hydrochloric acid to see a reaction.

CHS students soak pennies in hydrochloric acid to see a reaction.





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