Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar

CHS students study water properties

Campbellsville High School students are studying the properties of water.

 

In Lauren Bennett’s AP biology class, students recently learned all about water by performing several experiments.

 

At one station, students studied the effects of water on pennies. At other stations they looked at how adding food coloring changes water, how water interacts with sugar and vegetable oil and how water can make paper clips float.

 

Students also studied how to draw water as a chemical compound, and what kind of bonds it must make with objects.

 

CHS freshman Shelby Smith draws the water compound.

CHS freshman Shelby Smith draws the water compound.

 

CHS freshmen Gavin Johnson, at left, and Zaria Cowan see how food coloring changes water.

CHS freshmen Gavin Johnson, at left, and Zaria Cowan see how food coloring changes water.

 

CHS sophomore Natalie Caldwell sees how food coloring changes water.

CHS sophomore Natalie Caldwell sees how food coloring changes water.

 

CHS AP biology teacher Lauren Bennett helps freshmen Cole Kidwell, at left, and Patrick Walker with their water properties lab.

CHS AP biology teacher Lauren Bennett helps freshmen Cole Kidwell, at left, and Patrick Walker with their water properties lab.

 

CHS freshman Patrick Walker sees if he can get a paper clip to float in water.

CHS freshman Patrick Walker sees if he can get a paper clip to float in water.

 

CHS sophomores Evan McAninch, at left, and Casey Hardin see how sugar changes the properties of water.

CHS sophomores Evan McAninch, at left, and Casey Hardin see how sugar changes the properties of water.

 

CHS sophomore Evan McAninch sees how vegetable oil changes the properties of water.

CHS sophomore Evan McAninch sees how vegetable oil changes the properties of water.

 

From left, CHS freshmen Cole Kidwell and Patrick Walker and sophomore Evan McAninch see how vegetable oil and sugar change the properties of water.

From left, CHS freshmen Cole Kidwell and Patrick Walker and sophomore Evan McAninch see how vegetable oil and sugar change the properties of water.

 

CHS freshmen Aleah Knifley, at left, and Tahler Franklin see what effect water has on a penny.

CHS freshmen Aleah Knifley, at left, and Tahler Franklin see what effect water has on a penny.

 

CHS freshmen Aleah Knifley, at left, and Tahler Franklin see what effect water has on a penny.

CHS freshmen Aleah Knifley, at left, and Tahler Franklin see what effect water has on a penny.

 

CHS freshmen Christina Phipps, at left, and Jim Jefferies draw the water chemical compound.

CHS freshmen Christina Phipps, at left, and Jim Jefferies draw the water chemical compound.

 

CHS AP biology teacher Lauren Bennett, at left, helps freshmen Grant Rinehart and Christina Phipps draw the water chemical compound.

CHS AP biology teacher Lauren Bennett, at left, helps freshmen Grant Rinehart and Christina Phipps draw the water chemical compound.





Back to School News      Print News Article